Floyd-Warshall Algorithm With Java Examples - feature image

Floyd-Warshall Algorithm (With Java Example)

by Sven WoltmannApril 12, 2021

In this series about pathfinding algorithms, you have already read about Dijkstra's algorithm, the A* algorithm, and the Bellman-Ford algorithm. This last part will show you how the Floyd-Warshall algorithm works and what it is used for.

I will address the following topics in detail:

  • What is the intended use of the Floyd-Warshall algorithm?
  • How does the Floyd-Warshall algorithm differ from the pathfinding algorithms presented so far?
  • How does the Floyd-Warshall algorithm work (explained step by step with an example)?
  • How to implement the Floyd-Warshall algorithm in Java?
  • How to determine the time complexity of the Floyd-Warshall algorithm?

You can find the source code for the entire article series on pathfinding algorithms in this GitHub repository.

When to Use the Floyd-Warshall Algorithm?

All pathfinding algorithms presented so far find the shortest path from a single source node to a destination node (or to all other nodes of a graph).

Dijkstra prioritizes the search by total cost from the starting node. A* prioritizes additionally according to estimated remaining costs to the target. And Bellman-Ford does not prioritize at all but can handle negative edge weights.

Floyd-Warshall, on the other hand, finds the shortest paths between all pairs of start and destination nodes (Floyd's variant).

Transitive Closure of a Graph

Alternatively, Floyd-Warshall computes the so-called "transitive closure" of a graph (Warshall's variant). The transitive closure extends a graph by edges between all indirectly connected pairs of nodes. For example, if the graph has two edges – one from A to B and one from B to C – then the transitive closure extends the graph by the edge from A to C (since a path from A to C via B exists).

The following graphic shows a somewhat more complex example with four nodes - the initial graph on the left and its transitive closure on the right. The blue arrows represent the added, indirect connections:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm - transitive closure of a graph
Transitive closure of a graph

Both tasks are very similar: If a shortest path exists between two node pairs, then this node pair also belongs in the transitive closure – and vice versa. Therefore, the variants of Floyd and Warshall are combined into a single algorithm.

How Does the Floyd-Warshall Algorithm Work?

The algorithm is easy to implement, as you will see later. However, the explanation is a bit tricky. I will, therefore, first describe the algorithm with an example.

Floyd-Warshall Algorithm – Example

The following example graph contains five nodes, labeled A, B, C, D, E, and various directed and weighted edges:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: example graph
Floyd-Warshall algorithm: example graph

The numbers on the edges (the edge weights) represent the costs for the respective path. For example, the cost from E to B is 4.

Preparation – Node Pair Matrix

In preparation, we create an n × n matrix (n is the number of nodes) in which we enter – for each pair of nodes (i, j) – the weight of the edge from i to j if it exists. Otherwise, we enter infinity (∞). On the diagonal (the distance of a node to itself), we enter 0.

from / toABCDE
A02
B06
C70
D103
E140

From the table, we can read, for instance: The cost from A to B is 2 (row A, column B).

Floyd-Warshall Algorithm – Step by Step

We now perform the following five iterations. In each case, we examine one of the nodes as a potential intermediate node.

Iteration 1 – Indirect Paths via Intermediate Node A

For all node pairs (i, j), we compare the entered costs of the direct path with the costs of the indirect path from i to j via node A – i.e., the costs from node i to node A plus the costs from node A to node j (if such a path exists). If the costs via intermediate node A are lower than the previous ones, we replace the costs in the matrix.

Node pairs where i = j or i = A or j = A can be skipped. The distance of a node to itself is always 0. And if start or destination are already A, there is not also an indirect path via A.

We thus start with the node pair (B, C). The cost of the direct path is 6 (row B, column C). There is currently no known path from B to A (row B, column A contains infinity). So we cannot find a shorter route via A in this step. Accordingly, we cannot find shorter paths for (B, D) and (B, E) via A.

Also, from C and D, there are currently no known paths to node A (column A contains infinity for both rows C and D). Thus, we cannot currently find shorter routes for (C, B), (C, D), (C, E), (D, B), (D, C), (D, E).

At the node pair (E, B), things start to get interesting. The current cost of the direct path E→B is 4. Is there a shorter route via node A? Here is the corresponding section of the graph:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 1: Comparing paths E→B and E→A→B
Iteration 1: Comparing paths E→B and E→A→B

The cost from E to A is 1 (row E, column A in the table); the cost from A to B is 2 (row A, column B). These add up to 3. The cost of the indirect path from E to B via node A is, therefore, lower than that of the direct path. So we have found the following, shorter path:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 1: Path E→B→A is shorter than E→B
Iteration 1: Path E→B→A is shorter than E→B

We, therefore, replace the 4 in row E, column B with a 3 (highlighted in bold in the table):

from / toABCDE
A02
B06
C70
D103
E130

Next, we examine node pair (E, C). The current cost is infinity since no path has been found yet. Is there an indirect path via A, i.e., E→A→C? Since no path from A to C is currently known (row A, column C contains infinity), the answer is "no".

Finally, we look at the node pair (E, D). Since no path is known from A to D, we cannot find an indirect way E→A→D in this step.

We have examined all node pairs; step 1 is now complete. We now know the lowest cost for all node pairs if we also allow indirect paths via intermediate node A. In particular, we have found a shorter route from E to B via node A in this step.

Iteration 2 – Indirect Paths via Intermediate Node B

In the second iteration, we compare the costs entered for all node pairs (i, j) (these are now either the costs of the direct path or those via intermediate node A – whichever is lower) with the costs from i to j via node B.

We read the costs to and from node B from the matrix. This means that these do not necessarily have to be the costs of the direct path to/from node B. It could also be the lower costs via intermediate node A determined in step 1 (e.g., from E to B: 3 via A instead of 4 directly).

We start with node pair (A, C). So far, no path has been found (row A, column C contains infinity). Let's look at the indirect route via B:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 2: from A to C via B
Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 2: from A to C via B

The cost from A to B is 2, and the cost from B to C is 6. The sum is 8. This is better than no path at all. We, therefore, enter the 8 in row A, column C:

from / toABCDE
A028
B06
C70
D103
E130

We continue with node pair (A, D). Here, too, no path is known so far. Is there a route via intermediate node B? We have just read the costs from A to B as 2. From B to D, however, no path is known so far. Thus, we cannot determine any costs for route A→B→D, and the entry for node pair (A, D) remains unchanged (infinity).

The same happens with node pair (A, E): there is a path A→B, but no path B→E, hence no path A→B→E and therefore no new entry for node pair (A, E).

We come to the node pairs (C, A), (C, D), and (C, E): Currently, no path is known for all three pairs. There is a path C→B with a cost of 7, but there is no path from intermediate node B to A, to D, or E, so there can be no paths C→B→A, C→B→D, or C→B→E. Therefore, the entries for the three node pairs remain unchanged (infinity).

Node pairs (D, A), (D, C), and (D, E): Since there is no path from node D to intermediate node B, we cannot find any (or any shorter) paths for these three node pairs either.

Node pair (E, A): There is a path from E to B, but none from B to A, hence no path E→B→A.

Node pair (E, C) provides some momentum again: Currently, no path is known. Is there a route via B? There is a path E→B with a cost of 3 and a path B→C with a cost of 6. Thus, there is a path from E via B to C with a total cost of 9. We enter the 9 in row E, column C:

from / toABCDE
A028
B06
C70
D103
E1390

Note that this does not mean that the route from E to C has to go only via node B. After all, the path from E to B with cost 3 also goes via node A (which we had found in step 1). Strictly speaking, we have now found the path E→A→B→C:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 2: from E to C via B (and thus also via A)
Iteration 2: from E to C via B (and thus also via A)

Let us examine the last node pair in this iteration: (E, D). Does a route exist via intermediate node B? There is a path E→B with cost 3, but no path B→D, so there is no path E→B→D.

The second iteration is finished. We now know the lowest cost for all node pairs if we also allow indirect paths via node B – and indirectly via node A.

Iteration 3 – Indirect Paths via Intermediate Node C

We repeat the whole thing: Now, we compare for all node pairs the entered costs with those via intermediate node C. The costs to/from node C, which we again read from the matrix, can be those of the direct path to/from node C – but also the costs of indirect routes via node A and/or B determined in the previous iterations.

We start with node pair (A, B). The costs from A to intermediate node C are 8 (we had found this path via B at the beginning of the second iteration). The cost from C to B is 7. The way via intermediate node C thus has a total cost of 8 + 7 = 15. This route is significantly longer than the one currently stored with a cost of 2. You can also see this clearly in the graph: The path A→B is, of course, significantly shorter than A→B→C→B. We, therefore, leave the entry for (A, B) at 2.

Node pairs (A, D) and (A, E): We have just read the costs for A→C, but there are no paths C→D or C→E, so there are none from A via C to D or from A via C to E, respectively.

Node pair (B, A), (B, D), (B, E): the cost from B to C is 6, but from C, there is no path to A, to D, or E. Thus, in this iteration, we do not find any of the paths B→C→A, B→C→D, and B→C→E.

Node pair (D, A): There is a path from D to C, but none from C to A, thus none from D via C to A.

The cost of the node pair (D, B) is currently infinity, i.e., no path is known. That will change now. There is a path D→C with a cost of 1 and a path C→B with a cost of 7, which adds up to 8:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 3: from D to B via C
Iteration 3: from D to B via C

We thus enter 8 in row D, column B:

from / toABCDE
A028
B06
C70
D8103
E1390

Node pair (D, E): There is no known path from intermediate node C to E; thus, we do not find a way from D via C to E in this iteration.

Node pairs (E, A) and (E, D): Since there are no paths from intermediate node C to A or D, we currently cannot find a path from E via C to A or from E via C to D respectively.

Node pair (E, B): The cost for path E→C is 9, the cost for C→B is 7. In sum, 16. For path E→B, a cost of 3 is already stored. 16 is worse, so we leave the 3 unchanged.

Arriving at the end of iteration 3, we know the lowest cost for all node pairs if we also allow indirect paths via node C – and thus via A and B as well.

Iteration 4 – Indirect Paths via Intermediate Node D

We can abbreviate iteration 4: There is no path from any node to intermediate node D. Thus, we will not find a route via D for any node pair.

Iteration 5 – Indirect Paths via Intermediate Node E

In the last iteration, we check for all node pairs if we can find a shorter path via intermediate node E.

We can handle the node pairs with start nodes A, B, and C quickly: There is no path from any of these nodes to intermediate node E, so we will not find a route via E for any of these node pairs.

Node pair (D, A): the cost of path D→E is 3, and the cost of E→A is 1. Thus, there exists a path from D via E to A with a total cost of 4:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 5: from D to A via E
Iteration 5: from D to A via E

We enter the 4 in row D, column A:

from / toABCDE
A028
B06
C70
D48103
E1390

Node pair (D, B): The cost for the path D→E is still 3, the cost for E→B is also 3. Results in a total of 6. We have thus found a path from D via E to B with a total cost of 6. Currently, a total cost of 8 is entered here. We replace the 8 by 6:

from / toABCDE
A028
B06
C70
D46103
E1390

This case is again an example of the fact that the path via intermediate node E is not the direct path D→E→B, but in fact D→E→A→B, since the shortest path from E to B is via A (we had found the path E→A→B in the first iteration):

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Iteration 5: from D to B via E (and A)
Iteration 5: from D to B via E (and A)

The final node pair is (D, C): the cost for path D→E is still 3, the cost for E→C is 9. Results in a total of 12. That is worse than the cost of 1 currently stored for (D, C), which we thus let stand.

We have reached the end of the fifth iteration and now know the lowest cost for all node pairs if we also allow indirect paths via node E (and thus also via A, B, C, D) – that is, via any other nodes.

The goal of the algorithm is thus achieved.

Detecting Negative Cycles in the Graph

What is a negative cycle? And why does it pose a problem? I answered these questions in the article about the Bellman-Ford algorithm. This link leads directly to the corresponding section.

A negative cycle from any node will cause the cost from that node to itself to be negative. The Floyd-Warshall algorithm makes it very easy for us to see this. We can read the cost of all nodes to themselves directly from the matrix diagonal. Here is the matrix from the example above after running through all iterations:

from / toABCDE
A028
B06
C70
D46103
E1390

The diagonal line (highlighted in bold) contains only zeros. That means that there is no negative cycle.

If there were a negative number in at least one field on the diagonal, a negative cycle would be detected. The algorithm would then terminate with an error message.

Floyd-Warshall Algorithm – Determining the Shortest Paths

In its basic form described above, the Floyd-Warshall algorithm calculates only the cost of the shortest paths between two nodes but not the paths themselves (i.e., over which intermediate nodes the shortest path passes).

However, one can extend the algorithm easily so that determining the shortest path between two nodes is possible.

For this, we need a second matrix of size n × n, the so-called "successor matrix". Here we initially enter, for each node pair (i, j), the respective end node j . That means that the path from i to j initially goes via the successor j.

As soon as we find a shorter path via intermediate node k for any pair (i, j), we copy the current value of the matrix field (i, k) to position (i, j). That means that the path from i to j now leads through the same successor as the path from i to k. The successor can be k itself, but also another intermediate node on the shortest route to k.

In the example above, we would initially populate the successor matrix as follows:

from / toABCDE
A -B---
B--C--
C-B---
D--C-E
EAB---

In iteration 1, we find a shorter path from E to B via A. The successor of E on the path to A (row E, column A) is A; thus, we also enter A as the successor of E on the path to B (row E, column B):

from / toABCDE
A -B---
B--C--
C-B---
D--C-E
EAA---

Feel free to try updating the matrix yourself across all five iterations (as an exercise).

In the end, it should look like this (all changes are highlighted in bold):

from / toABCDE
A -BB--
B--C--
C-B---
DEEC-E
EAAA--

How can we read the shortest paths from this matrix?

Let's take the path from D to B that we had calculated in the fifth iteration.

We read from the matrix step by step:

  • Row D, column B: The direct successor of D on the route to B is: E
  • Row E, column B: The direct successor of E on the route to B is: A
  • Row A, column B: The direct successor of A on the route to B is: B (target node reached)

Thus, the complete shortest path is D→E→A→B.

Here again, for comparison, is the graph from the fifth iteration:

Floyd-Warshall algorithm: Shortest path from D to B: D→E→A→B
Shortest path from D to B: D→E→A→B

The path read from the successor matrix matches the path drawn.

Floyd-Warshall Algorithm – Informal Description

The informal description – and the code (following in the next chapter) – are surprisingly simple. The steps for determining the complete paths are marked as optional. To not confuse the two matrices, I refer to them in the following as cost matrix and successor matrix.

Preparation:

  1. Create the cost matrix of size n × n (n is the number of nodes).
  2. For each node pair (i, j), enter the cost of the direct path from i to j if it exists; otherwise, enter infinity.
  3. Enter zeros on the diagonal.

Optional preparation: creating the successor matrix:

  1. Create the successor matrix of size n × n.
  2. For each node pair (i, j), enter the value j.

Execute the following iteration n times; let k be the loop counter and refer to the intermediate node:

  • For each node pair (i, j):
    • Calculate the sum of the cost of path ik (to be read in row i, column k of the cost matrix) and the cost of path kj (to be read in row k, column j of the cost matrix).
    • If the sum is smaller than the cost of the path ij (to be read in row i, column j of the cost matrix), then
      1. enter the new, lower costs in row i, column j of the cost matrix;
      2. (optionally) copy the value from field (i, k) to field (i, j) in the successor matrix.

Finally, check whether there is a negative number on the diagonal of the cost matrix. If so, terminate the algorithm with the error message "Negative cycle detected". Otherwise, the algorithm has run successfully.

Floyd-Warshall Algorithm in Java

In this chapter, I show you step by step how to implement the Floyd-Warshall algorithm in Java. You can find the complete source code in the eu.happycoders.pathfinding.floyd_warshall package of the GitHub repository.

Data Structure for the Graph: Guava ValueGraph

As in the previous parts of the series, we use the MutableValueGraph from the Google Core Libraries for Java (Guava). In the following code snippet, you can see how to create the directed graph from the example above (method TestWithSampleGraph.createSampleGraph()):


private static ValueGraph<String, Integer> createSampleGraph() {
  MutableValueGraph<String, Integer> graph = ValueGraphBuilder.directed().build();
  graph.putEdgeValue("A", "B", 2);
  graph.putEdgeValue("B", "C", 6);
  graph.putEdgeValue("C", "B", 7);
  graph.putEdgeValue("D", "C", 1);
  graph.putEdgeValue("D", "E", 3);
  graph.putEdgeValue("E", "A", 1);
  graph.putEdgeValue("E", "B", 4);
  return graph;
}

The type parameters of VaueGraph are:

  1. Type of nodes: we use String for the node names "A" to "E".
  2. Type of edge weights: in the example, we use Integer.

In the putEdgeValue() method, we first specify the starting node, followed by the target node and the edge weight.

Data Structure for the Cost and Successor Matrix

Two-dimensional arrays are suitable as a data structure for the matrices:

int n = graph.nodes().size();
int[][] costs = new int[n][n];
int[][] successors = new int[n][n];

Since we want our algorithm to return both matrices in the end, we encapsulate both in the FloydWarshallMatrices class. In the repository, you will see that this class also has a print() method that we can use to print the matrices to the console for testing.

Indexing the Graph's Nodes

The rows and columns of the two-dimensional arrays are addressed with indexes 0 to n-1. However, our nodes are identified by names, not by numbers. So we need a mapping rule between index and node name.

The graph.nodes() method returns a Set of the nodes, i.e., a non-indexable data structure.

However, we can convert the set to an array very easily:

String[] nodes = graph.nodes().toArray(new String[n]);

Using nodes[i], we can now determine the associated node name for row or column i.

Preparation: Filling the Matrixes

We initially fill the matrices as follows (method FloydWarshall.findShortestPaths()). The variable m represents the instance of the FloydWarshallMatrices class that contains the two matrices.

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
  for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
    Optional<Integer> edgeValue = graph.edgeValue(nodes[i], nodes[j]);
    m.costs[i][j] = i == j ? 0 : edgeValue.orElse(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
    m.successors[i][j] = edgeValue.isPresent() ? j : -1;
  }
}

In the cost matrix, we use Integer.MAX_VALUE as representation for infinity. Of course, this only works as long as the cost does not get close to this value (231-1). For the demonstration of the algorithm, it is a sufficient abstraction.

In the successor matrix, we enter -1 if there is no path for a node pair.

We could also work with Integer objects and null values for both matrices, or even with Optional<Integer>, but that would have lower performance.

Iterations

For the iterations, we nest three loops inside each other:

  • The outer one, with loop counter k, iterates over the intermediate nodes.
  • The two inner ones, with loop counters i and j, iterate over all node pairs.
for (int k = 0; k < n; k++) {
  for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
      int costViaNodeK = addCosts(m.costs[i][k], m.costs[k][j]);
      if (costViaNodeK < m.costs[i][j]) {
        m.costs[i][j] = costViaNodeK;
        m.successors[i][j] = m.successors[i][k];
      }
    }
  }
}

Within the loops, we add the costs of paths ik and kj and compare the sum to the cost of path ij. If the sum via intermediate node k is smaller, then we set the cost of path ij to the recalculated lower cost, and we set the successor node of path ik as the successor node for path ij.

The addCosts() method returns infinity (in the form of Integer.MAX_VALUE) if either of the two summands is infinity:

private static int addCosts(int a, int b) {
  if (a == Integer.MAX_VALUE || b == Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
    return Integer.MAX_VALUE;
  }
  return a + b;
}

Detecting Negative Cycles

After running through the iterations, we check for negative cycles:

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
  if (m.costs[i][i] < 0) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Graph has a negative cycle");
  }
}

In the end, the findShortestPaths() method returns the FloydWarshallMatrices instance m.

Determining the Shortest Path Between Two Nodes

I implemented the calculation of the shortest path from one node to another in the method FloydWarshallMatrices.getPath(). i and j are the indices of the start and end nodes:

if (successors[i][j] == -1) {
  return Optional.empty();
}

List<String> path = new ArrayList<>();
path.add(nodes[i]);

while (i != j) {
  i = successors[i][j];
  path.add(nodes[i]);
}

return Optional.of(List.copyOf(path));

First we check if successors[i][j] is equal to -1. If this is the case, no path from i to j exists, and the method returns an empty Optional.

Otherwise, we create a list path and fill it with the initial node, and then – one by one – with the successor nodes of the path. Finally, we return a non-modifiable copy of the list ("defensive copy").

Invoking the findShortestPaths() Method

The following three examples in the repository show how to invoke the findShortestPaths() method:

Floyd-Warshall Time Complexity

The time complexity of the Floyd-Warshall algorithm is easily determined. We have three nested loops, each counting n passes. In the innermost loop, we have a comparison that can be performed with constant time. The comparison is performed n × n × n times – or times.

The time complexity of Floyd-Warshall is thus: O(n³)

Free Bonus:

Big O Cheat Sheet

[7 Time Complexity Classes on 1 Page]

Use this 1-page PDF cheat sheet as a reference to quickly look up the seven most important time complexity classes (with descriptions and examples).

You get access to this PDF by signing up to my newsletter. I won't send any spam, and you can opt out at any time.
Invalid email address

Floyd-Warshall Runtime

Using the program TestFloydWarshallRuntime, we can check whether the algorithm's running time fits the inferred time complexity O(n³). The program creates random graphs of different sizes and calculates the shortest paths in them. The program repeats each test 50 times and outputs the median of all measured values.

The following diagram shows the runtime as a function of the graph's size:

Time complexity of the Floyd-Warshall algorithm
Time complexity of the Floyd-Warshall algorithm

The cubic growth can be seen clearly: When the number of nodes doubles (e.g., from 1,000 to 2,000), the time required increases eightfold (from 700 ms to about 6 s).

Floyd-Warshall vs. Dijkstra vs. Bellman-Ford

In the following diagram, I compare the running times of Floyd-Warshall, Bellman-Ford (optimized and not optimized), and Dijkstra (with Fibonacci Heap):

Time complexity Floyd-Warshall vs. Dijkastra vs. Bellman-Ford
Time complexity Floyd-Warshall vs. Dijkastra vs. Bellman-Ford

Floyd-Warshall is, as expected due to its time complexity, even slower than Bellman-Ford.

So when should which algorithm be used?

  • Floyd-Warshall should only be used when the shortest paths between all node pairs are sought.
  • Bellman-Ford should be used when the graph contains negative edge weights.
  • A* should be used if the graph does not have negative edge weights, and a heuristic can be defined.
  • Without negative edge weights and heuristics, Dijkstra's algorithm should be used.

Summary

This article has shown you when to use the Floyd-Warshall algorithm (when you need the shortest distances between all node pairs), how it works, and how it identifies negative cycles.

The time complexity of O(n³) is significantly worse than that of all pathfinding algorithms presented so far. Floyd-Warshall should, therefore, only be used for the intended purpose.

This concludes the series on pathfinding algorithms. If you liked the article, feel free to share it using one of the share buttons at the end. Do you have any questions or suggestions? Then feel free to leave me a comment. Do you want to be informed when the next article is published? Then sign up for my newsletter using the form below.

Free Bonus:

Big O Cheat Sheet

[7 Time Complexity Classes on 1 Page]

Use this 1-page PDF cheat sheet as a reference to quickly look up the seven most important time complexity classes (with descriptions and examples).

You get access to this PDF by signing up to my newsletter. I won't send any spam, and you can opt out at any time.
Invalid email address
Sven Woltmann
About the author
I'm a freelance software developer with more than two decades of experience in scalable Java enterprise applications. My focus is on optimizing complex algorithms and on advanced topics such as concurrency, the Java memory model, and garbage collection. Here on HappyCoders.eu, I want to help you become a better Java programmer. Read more about me here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You might also like the following articles